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Friday, 20 May 2016 21:02

Conventional building methods not suited to African conditions

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moladi - Brickless Construction System| moladi - Brickless Construction System| moladi|

Conventional building methods not suited to African conditions

Housing and construction systems developer Moladi says its low-cost housing system, comprising plastic formwork panels and a cement admixture, is widely embraced throughout Africa, as it has been specifically designed to meet the requirements of the African market.

Moladi founder and CEO Hennie Botes says the system alleviates challenges associated with conventional building methods, including excessive costs, labour-intensive processes and the availability of materials. He notes that while the aforementioned challenges are not specific to African countries, they are exacerbated by other uniquely African obstacles.

moladi-engineering-news-formwork

Botes adds that the Moladi system works because it circumvents the lack of adequate infrastructure and funding, as well as the dearth of skilled labour prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa: “The system can be easily transported to virtually anywhere, including far-flung rural areas and informal settlements. The construction process does not require skilled labourers, heavy machinery or electricity, and the system uses building materials that are locally sourced.”

Further, a structure built using the Moladi system costs about 30% less to construct than a similar structure that uses conventional methods.

The system uses lightweight, reusable formwork to create a mould filled with aerated mortar – which has been approved by national standards authority South African Bureau of Standards and certified by national assessment body for nonstandardised construction materials Agrement South Africa – to form walls.

Typically, a cubic metre of Moladi’s mortar comprises 1 800 kg of local river sand, 250 kg of 42.5 N Ordinary Portland Cement, 5 ℓ of MoladiCHEM ( a nontoxic water-based chemical mixture) and 200 ℓ of water. Botes states that admixture produces a mortar that “flows easily, is waterproof and has good thermal and sound-insulating properties.”

He says before the start of each project, the locally acquired aggregate undergoes testing at Moladi’s laboratory in town/city, in the Eastern Cape. “This is to ensure that the aggregate is the correct size and quality for structural stability, and to determine the correct ratios of cement, sand, water and MoladiCHEM to produce the desired compressive strength.”

Botes mentions that the number of workers required depends on the size of the housing project, but that between four and ten workers are typically required to construct a 45 m2  housing unit.

Unskilled workers from the area can be trained on site by a Moladi foreman over a two-week period. The process of erecting the first house forms part of the training programme. While there is no additional cost for training, arrangements for the foreman’s travel, food and accommodation have to be made and/ or paid for by the client.

The client, whether a rural community, local contractor or nonprofit organisation (NPO), is supplied with a working document and assembly instructions, including the guidelines and recommended mix design for the mortar.

Botes says “it is essentially up to the client to ensure adherence to our guidelines. However, as a quality assurance measure, Moladi requires consistent strength testing of the mortar mixes from an independent laboratory”. Moreover, a certified structural engineer has to approve the design, reinforcing schedule and housing units before they can be occupied. 

moladi-engineering-news-pour

Construction Process
Botes explains that the housing units are erected on floating raft foundation. The formwork panels comprise interlocking components that join to form wall configurations of any length or height, but with a thickness of 150 mm for external walls and 100 mm for internal, non-load-bearing walls.

The internal panels are erected first, with the steel reinforcing, window and door block-outs positioned within the wall cavity. The external panels are then erected to seal off the wall cavity prior to it being filled with the mortar mix. For a relatively small structure (between 45 m2 and 74m2 ), this phase takes a four-person team about six hours to complete.

The mortar sets overnight or after 12 hours in good conditions. “The setting time will not be affected if the temperature remains at 20 C. Should the temperature be cooler than 20 C, the mortar would take proportionally longer to set. Significantly, the effects of rain are allayed as the mortar is securely placed and covered by the formwork limiting any unwanted exposure.“

Once the mortar has set, the panels are removed, and the various sections can be transferred and reused for another housing unit on the same site. The first unit’s walls are painted using cementitious water-based paint; the roof, windows, doors and finishings, such as lighting and sanitary ware, are installed. This  phase takes about ten hours.

The system is ideally suited to large-scale, low-cost housing projects. Botes says Moladi has not participated in the Reconstruction and Development Programme housing project because “it is a question of finding the right, reputable contractor and developer to work with”. He believes that finding a reliable partner will ensure that Moladi is not associated with any of the negativity that the programme has been associated with, specifically reports of substandard houses.

The company has, however, been involved in numerous projects with NPOs and nongovernmental organisations for similar community-based low-income housing initiatives.

For more information on moladi - www.moladi.net

 

 

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  • Builder of the FUTURE - moladi

    Moladi Construction Systems has developed a way in which houses and social infrastructure can be built faster and cheaper, without jeopardising the structural integrity of buildings - Builder of the FUTURE

    Glenneis Kriel - Finweek - Download

    Builder of the FUTURE - moladi

    While most other industries have undergone tremendous change, the building and construction sector has seen little new technological breakthroughs over the past fifty years. That was until Hennie Botes, the founder of Moladi, came along.

    Realising the struggles of the poor in getting good quality housing, already in the 1980s, Botes decided to do something about it. His solution was the development of a whole new building system, which he named Moladi. The system replaces the cumbersome bricklaying process with an approach similar to plastic injection moulding.

    moladi moulds Houses Hennie Botes

    A “mould” is produced by training local unskilled labour to assemble reusable plastic injection moulded panels, commonly known as formwork. The formwork is erected on an engineered designed raft foundation. Doors, windows, electrical and water reticulation are mounted in the appropriate positions onto the formwork. Thereafter the formwork is filled with a quick-setting aerated mortar, consisting of sand, cement and an admixture. The house is left to set overnight and the formwork is removed the following day and re-erected on the next foundation. The superstructure is finished by fixing conventional roof, plumbing fixtures, ceiling etc., hanging doors, glazing and painting.

    Botes has built thousands of houses all around the world – from Mexico to Sri Lanka– with the system. One of his greatest recent breaks, was the construction of a 1600 square metre courthouse, funded by the World Bank in Tanzania this year, which the World Economic Forum (WEF) has named one of six buildings to revolutionise the construction industry. Future of Construction |World Economic Forum

    According to the WEF, the Kibaha District Courthouse was built for half the money it would have cost when using conventional methods at about 250 USD/square meter. The building was completed in six months, whereas it would have taken three years with traditional methods.  

    What did you do before you started Moladi?

    I am a toolmaker by trade and completed my apprenticeship with the South African Railways. Toolmaking entails the making of steel moulds to create plastic components. Napoleon Hill’s book, Think and Grow Rich, made a huge impression on me, especially the suggestion that you should “solve a problem and sell the solution.”

    When my wife fell pregnant with our first child, we heard a lot of people complaining about how difficult it was to bath babies having to carry bath water to and fro. To solve the problem, I developed and patented a plastic baby bath that fitted across the bathtub. The design was sold all over the world, resulting in 20 000 sales per month in five years time. The invention gave me the freedom and finances to start Moladi.

    Why did you start Moladi?

    One of the problems in South Africa, actually with most countries, is that we do not necessarily teach our children things in which they might thrive. We have this dated British schooling system, where you are nothing if you are bad in maths or science. The result is 800 000 unemployed university graduates and a very high unemployment rate amongst school leavers. On the other hand, crafts and trades that could have contributed to economic growth are neglected resulting in a shortage of craftsman, tradesman and entrepreneurs and the closing down of many factories and businesses in the country. We should be teaching “entrepreneurship” in schools – not by teachers, but by entrepreneurs. Fish don’t teach birds to fly.

    I have seen this in townships back in the 1980s already, where poor craftsmanship resulted in most of our less fortunate citizens living in inferior housing structures. I wanted to fix this problem. My toolmaking background then gave me a great idea. Instead of having people lay and cement bricks to build a house, which is very difficult if you don’t have the know-how and skill, I decided to develop a plastic mould system and cast structures– which is filled with a sand and cement mortar – to make houses more affordable, reduce the impact of human error and accelerate the building process.

    The moulds can be assembled in different configurations, so you can build anything from a small 40 square metre one roomed house to a double storied four-bedroomed house. Or it can be used to build a school or anything for that matter.

    What does the word Moladi mean?

    The word came to me while I was praying in my garden. Back then, we did not have internet and I had no idea what it meant. I nevertheless felt that it was supposed to be the name of the company.

    Later I discovered that Moladi was the name in a Croatian bible referring to the Palestinian town Moladah and that it meant to “give birth” or “to bring forth. How appropriate, since I see Moladi gives birth to a house every time the formwork is removed. Also fitting in that it helps to “give birth” to other people’s dreams of having their own homes and earning an income in constructing the units.

    How does your business plan work?

    Making money is important, but it has never been the main drive of the business. I believe that when you follow your passion and deliver a quality product, money will usually follow you.

    My idea with the business was to help solve housing problems in South Africa, while generating new employment opportunities and in effect contributing to economic growth. So I supply training in the construction of Moladi houses and licence people who finish the course to build Moladi houses. I prefer working with cooperatives rather than individuals, as it means that people will be checking up on each other. This is especially important when it comes to cash flow. Many new entrepreneurs fail because they tend to splurge on want-to-haves, such as bakkies and new cell phones, instead of the must-haves required to make the business grow. 

    Training is provided for free, but trainees need to pay for the moulds and admixture. Our licensees are supplied with viable business plans to help them secure business loans for their start ups. I have a vested interest in the success of the licensees, since poor outcome will reflect badly on my business. Trainees are selected carefully to try and prevent potential failures and I really develop a close relationship with them to ensure their success.

    How do you minimise risks of your licensees?

    Firstly, there is no incentive to take shortcuts by skimping on building materials, as it is relatively cheap to build these houses and therefore the margins are bigger than conventional construction. It differs from conventional construction, where people steal building material like bricks or blocks off site or simply reduce the cement content in the mortar or plaster mixes when the cash flow runs out.

    Secondly, since river sand is used from the local quarry nearest the building site, the licensees are required to send us a sample of the river sand they will use to us for analysis. Based on the sieve grading results in the laboratory, we will advise them on whether they would have to add more coarse aggregate or more fines. The sand is mixed with cement and an admixture, which we specify based on the analysis, to create the mortar. The admixture creates air bubbles in the mortar, which helps to enhance the flow ability and thermal properties of the wall.

    Cube samples are also taken of the mortar during casts to ensure the mix complies with our standards.

    How does the price of constructing your houses compare with that of the way in which traditional houses are built?

    It is really difficult to say, since there is such a great variation in the quotes and final results in the traditional building industry. A little while ago, I saw quotes ranging from R8,5 million to R34 million for the construction of 640 houses in Paterson. Would 640 cars vary so much from dealership to dealership? All builders and contractors have one common denominator – The building material supplier. Therefore, the only way in which the builders and contractors can compete and make profit is through managing the labour, work flow and the quality of our work. Should they fail in managing this process; the result will be loss of profit. Should rework be required, the loss will be even greater. This business model is based on the ability of the skilled artisan to deliver. Yet, how does one measure the production ability of individuals throughout the week – Monday to Friday (and pay day)?

    The bottom line with Moladi is that the building material used, cost less – River sand being the bulk of the content. Eliminating “waiting time” saves a tremendous amount of money, not only labour cost, but also in holding cost. With Moladi, the first houses can be finished within a week and due to the benefit of the production process brought about, one per day thereafter. There is also less room for error, since there are fewer variables that need to be planned for and considered. 

    Not counting innovation, what would you say is one of the biggest strengths of your company?

    We are a small team, which means that our overhead structure allows us to function profitably in the low cost mass market. Companies with high overheads simply cannot compete in this small margin big volume space. The real market requires vast amount of homes below the R500, 000 range and this is the market that we as Moladi focus on. I did most of the work alone for many years after I started the company. These days my two daughters, Shevaughn and Camalynne are key to the successful running of moladi and they fulfil vital roles. We outsource work in order to keep overheads down and have very good relationships with various suppliers, building experts, engineers, town planners, architects, funding institutions, etc. We pride ourselves that we are equipped to take land to stand to home to key as a “one stop shop”.

    What has been some of your greatest achievements of things that made you most proud?

    We have won numerous awards, including the South African Bureau of Standards Design for Development Award in 1997, the Housing Innovation Award of ABSA bank and the National Home Builders Council in 2006 and the Affordable Housing Competition held by Delta Bank in Accra in 2009 to mention a few.  We were also selected by the Smithsonian institute to showcase Moladi at the United Nations in New York - “Design for the other 90%”.

    However, what really makes me tick is to see how our licensees succeed in their business. What I really enjoyed of the Tanzania project was that we trained a few very devoted people. Over time, however, those people trained other people in the community. As such Moladi has brought hope and helped people to break out of the poverty cycle. And most of those people are women.

    What has been your greatest challenges in getting Moladi off the ground?

    People are hesitant to try out new things, especially when it comes to something as personal and dear as investing in a home. Many people also think that Moladi uses alternative building materials, which we do not. To me Moladi should be categorized as a superior building technology (SBT) and not as an Alternative Building Technology (ABT), because it is a totally new superior way of building – an improvement on what we have been doing over the past thousand years. Instead of casting a brick in a mould, we cast a house in a mould. What has elevated Moladi as a technology was not the lowering of cost to produce, but the social acceptance factor. The client wants to live in a Moladi home, as it looks and feels the same as a traditional built home. Simply put the proverbial knock test.

    The Moladi building system produces houses that are approved and enrolled by NHBRC and certified by the Agremént board of South Africa (CSIR) and banks in South Africa are willing to finance Moladi homes. Longevity and resale ability are two key criteria used by the financial institutions as yardstick. This we have demonstrated and proven with our first home built in 1987 – As good as new. We are very excited working with the World Bank in Tanzania as the success of the project has proven to management that due to the simplicity, combined with quality and speed, the cost effectiveness of Moladi is what is needed in the rest of Africa and this advantage is being promoted by the World Bank.

    How many houses have you built since you have started Moladi?

    We have only built three hundred in South Africa, due to terrible bottlenecks and government bureaucracies. This is bound to change in the nearby future due to rising pressure caused by the shortage of houses and there not being enough skilled artisans companies to help address this shortage. Politically and for the peace of our country, Government can no longer afford to give billions of Rand to unskilled emerging companies who build houses that have to be rebuilt five years later due to bad workmanship and inferior quality of materials.

    Most of our projects have been implemented overseas, in more than 21 countries. We have for example built 800 houses in Mexico and are currently in negotiations for large project in Cameroon, Ivory Coast, Zambia, Ghana, Nigeria, Mauritius and Namibia.

    What is your general impression of the international housing industry?

    Food and shelter, according to Maslow’s Hierarchy, are the most basic needs of any living being. Housing has however become extremely expensive, even in countries like the United Kingdom people are struggling to make ends meet with mortgages being extended to thirty and thirty five years in order to reduce cost of monthly repayments. In developing and third world countries, there tends to be a lot of talk about housing for the poor, especially from politicians. In most of these cases governments are unable to meet the rising demand due to a shortage of know-how, skills and funding.

    What are your plans for the short to medium term?

    We are currently in negotiations with the National Home Builders Registration Council (NHBRC) to establish Moladi training colleges in all the provinces in the country. South Africa is struggling to reach its target of building 2,3 million houses, due to a lack of skilled artisans and qualifying contractors. We hope that Moladi would help to pull things together by training our people to build houses for themselves – it is an initiative into which large companies can also buy in. The National Development Plan needs a “TOOL” to kick-start the implementation thereof. Moladi is a “TOOL” to solving two major issues facing South Africa – One the very high unemployment rate – Two the huge housing backlog of 2.3 million subsidy homes let alone the GAP market and mud school eradication program. The motto – Jobs for the unemployed – Food for the hungry – Shelter for the homeless – Taxes for Government. My interpretation of “circular economy”.

    What are your long-term plans?

    There are a few goals we have set ourselves – The first being to establish moladi as the “Henry Ford” of mass housing. This we intend achieving by producing as many components and products to help reduce cost of “producing” homes on a production line basis – From production to homeowner, bypassing  the middleman in the supply chain . Second would be to look at how we are able to offer funding in a different format that would assist home ownership.  And thirdly, to look at rental stock as a means to house those that purely want to rent.  This product would be aimed to replace shacks and informal settlements.

    The regulatory requirement enforced on the financial institutions make it very difficult for the ordinary man in the street to qualify for a mortgage and it is this market that needs a different financing option in order to own a home. The automotive industry is a good example of the many different ways of purchasing a car. Maybe the time has come to adapt the homeownership criteria to accommodate the many many that rent purely because they do not fulfil the current stringent lending conditions.

     www.moladi.co.za

  • Beyond brick and mortar houses

    Beyond brick and mortar houses

    The inefficiencies of moulding a brick or block in a mould then tasking an artisan to lay them. Then chase the walls for water and electrical services. Then relying on another artisan to plaster the walls. Dependent on the skills and ability of artisans to produce a house. At what cost?

    Conventional brick and mortar construction process:

    • How many bricks or blocks are laid per day?
    • Are the quantity of bricks or blocks laid per day the same for every day of the week?
    • What happens when the bricklayer does not come to work?
    • Is the dagha (mortar) mix to lay the bricks or blocks consistent?
    • How many bricks or blocks are wasted or broken or stolen?
    • Are walls straight plumb and square?
    • How long to chase for electricity piping?
    • How long to chase for water piping?
    • How long does it take to do beam filling?
    • How long does it take to plaster window reveals?
    • Is plaster thickness consistent or does it vary?
    • Is the plaster mix consistent?
    • Any rework?
    • Rubble to clear?
    • At what cost?

    “If you can't measure it, you can't manage it.” - Peter Drucker

    This leads to the question: Are the inefficiencies of the brick and mortar construction process making homes unaffordable for most?

    The moladi Injection Moulding Construction Process

    Beyond Brick and mortar houses

    Casting a house in a moladi mould employing unskilled workers – Eliminating the dependence on skilled artisans - Eliminating the need to chase, plaster and beam fill. Completed in a day. At a known cost.

    moladi Construction Process

    • Erecting the formwork by unskilled labour is constant.
    • No stays.
    • No propping.
    • No consumables.
    • Formwork holds a constant precise volume.
    • Mortar a known cost.
    • Mortar is a known consistent compressive strength.
    • Reinforcing a known weight/cost.
    • Time to position and bind reinforcing constant.
    • Filling the formwork is consistent.
    • Removing the formwork is constant.
    • Labour is not skilled.

    “If you can't measure it, you can't manage it.” - Peter Drucker

    This is why moladi was selected for the Tanzanian Courthouses Project and funded by the World Bank - Read more at - Future of Construction - World Economic Forum

    To view a video on the sequential step-by-step process - Visit the link to our latest project in Gauteng - South Africa - Gauteng Education Department

    moladi designed to create jobs for the unemployed food for the hungry shelter for the homeless

    What if we told you the solution to the global youth unemployment and the million-plus housing backlog was already in our back yard? And what if we told you jobless, unskilled people could become entrepreneurs in the house building sector and be able to build homes in their communities at a fraction of the cost and in less than a week?

    What would you say if we told you there is a company that is not only prepared to certify you, but to empower you too and give you a market, technology and the opportunity to grow personally and professionally? Build a community in a month

    For more on moladi visit www.moladi.co.za  

  • Injection moulded construction process - moladi

    The moladi injection moulded construction process

    The inefficiencies of moulding a brick or block in a mould then tasking an artisan to lay them. Then chase the walls for water and electrical services. Then relying on another artisan to plaster the walls. Depending on the skills and ability of artisans to produce a house vs casting a house in a mould employing unskilled workers – eliminating the need to chase and plaster, in a day, at a known cost. This we refer to as the moladi"injection moulding construction process". Future of Construction - World Economic Forum

    Molding or Moulding Process

    Molding or moulding is the process of manufacturing by shaping liquid or pliable raw material using a rigid frame called a mold or matrix. This itself may have been made using a pattern, a model or formwork of the final object.  
    A mold or mould is a hollowed-out block (cavity) that is filled with a liquid or pliable material such as plastic, glass, metal, ceramic raw material or mortar (sand and cement). The liquid hardens or sets inside the mold, adopting its shape. A mold is the counterpart to a cast.

    Injection moulded construction process

    Disruptive Innovation

    A disruptive innovation is an innovation that helps create a new market and value network, and eventually disrupts an existing market and value network (over a few years or decades), displacing an earlier technology

    Modern Building Methods Using Modern Building Materials

    moladi Construction System aims to address the challenge by providing a scalable, low-tech and low-skilled affordable building solution using in-situ casting. Founded in 1986 by South African social entrepreneur Hennie Botes, the company aims to replace the classic brick-and-mortar construction with an easier method: using a patented lightweight, removable and re-usable plastic injection moulded formwork system that is filled with fast setting aerated mortar to cast entire houses on-site. The process is deliberately designed to be labour intensive to boost local employment and local production without requiring prior construction experience or skills. The moladi construction process mostly uses local supplies apart from the reusable formwork and a special additive to aerate the mortar (concrete without stone) to reduce the density, thereby enhancing the thermal properties of the structure. The other function of the additive is to water proof the wall and enhance the flow ability of the mortar within the formwork eliminating the need to vibrate.

    Through creative engineering and sophisticated manufacturing, moladi aims to advance living standards and spaces affordably. moladi is an advanced building technology that utilises an innovative re-usable plastic formwork system to reduce the required skills to produce quality affordable homes and other structures that are socially acceptable by speeding up delivery and thus reducing cost. By emulating the methodology of the automotive assembly line, moladi implements the principles applied by Henry Ford; reducing cost by increasing production output by de-skilling the production operation, making homes affordable

    The advantage that moladi brings to the “production process” is that the process can measured and maintained, ensuring consistent speed and quality within budget.

    Conventional Masonry Construction

    • How many bricks or blocks are laid per day?
    • Are the quantity of bricks or blocks laid per day the same for every day of the week?
    • What happens when the bricklayer does not come to work?
    • Is the dagha (mortar) mix to lay the bricks or blocks consistent?
    • How many bricks or blocks are wasted or broken or stolen?
    • Are walls straight plumb and square?
    • How long to chase for electricity piping?
    • How long to chase for water piping?
    • How long does it take to do beam filling?
    • How long does it take to plaster window reveals?
    • Is plaster thickness consistent or does it vary?
    • Is the plaster mix consistent?
    • Any rework?
    • Rubble to clear?

    Therefore, “If you can't measure it, you can't manage it.” - Peter Drucker

    By using moladi the above variables are excluded from the equation.

    moladi Construction Process

    • Erecting the formwork is constant.
    • No stays
    • No propping
    • No consumables
    • Formwork holds a constant precise volume.
    • Mortar a known cost.
    • Mortar is a known consistent compressive strength.
    • Reinforcing a known weight/cost.
    • Time to position and bind reinforcing constant.
    • Filling the formwork is consistent.
    • Removing the formwork is constant.
    • Labour is not skilled.

    Injection Moulding Process

    Mould closes – Material Injected – Cools – Ejects the finished component. A known cycle time at a known cost.

    injection molded moladi house

    This we refer to as the moladi "injection moulded" construction process. A “lean construction” principal.

    Lightweight Formwork Building System

    Lean Construction - Lean Production

    One of the important principles under a lean production paradigm is termed ‘lean assembly’. This refers to simplifying the process of assembly through industrialisation, modularisations, standardisation, and continuous flow processes. The reduction of operations required for a production process means less chance of the occurrence of errors, waste and rework.

    This follows from the same logic that the fewer the number of operations, the higher the quality of the product and a predictive timeline, resulting in cost savings. moladi formwork system provides and assists with the full range of requirements involved in the transfer and use of a proven low-cost construction technology.

    Jobs Food through Shelter

    moladi supplies technology and supports transfer of know-how to empower individuals to achieve self-worth, by meaningful action to raise those at the “bottom of the pyramid” to a higher level, supplying a proven technology with an impressive track record (Est. 1986). This is how moladi can address the delivery of quality homes in less time, creating jobs by employing unskilled local labour - developing skills and entrepreneurs.

    moladi designed to create jobs for the unemployed food for the hungry shelter for the homeless

    moladiA Technology Supplier

    We skill entrepreneurs, contractors, business owners and construction companies how to “produce” using moladi construction technologies - “What if we told you the solution to the 25% national unemployment statistic (36% youth unemployment) and the million-plus housing backlog was already in our back yard? And what if we told you jobless, unskilled South Africans could become entrepreneurs in the house building sector and be able to build homes in their communities at a fraction of the cost and in less than a week? What would you say if we told you there is a company that is not only prepared to certify you, but to empower you too and give you a market, technology and the opportunity to grow personally and professionally?" - Link

    References:

    World Economic Forum - Future on Construction – World Bank

    How Elon Musk and other pioneers (moladi) are shaking up the construction industry | World Economic Forum #WEF #Tesla

    The $300 House Blog - Affordable Housing: Moladi's Hennie Botes on Innovation & Perseverance

    Reduce cost of construction

    Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results

    "Injection molded Houses" implementing lightweight injection molded modular plastic formwork as a re-usable "mould" to cast homes in-situ - Video

    Prevent shack fires from occurring and destroying people’s lives

    The only structures, built as a show unit after the earthquake that struck in 2010, standing in the show village after Hurricane Matthew in 2017

    Certification and Awards

    SABS | Agrément Certification | NHBRC | Bank approved (1993)

    2017 –World Economic Forum - Boston Consulting Group – Future of Construction – World Bank funded project

    2016 – Best of African Design - moladi showcased for a year at the Cube Museum in the Netherlands

    2014 – Africa is now - moladi displayed at Design Indaba Cape Town

    2012 – moladi selected as a finalist of the international Frost & Sullivan Green Excellence Award for Sustainable Development.

    2012 – International Case Study conducted by FSG and the Rockefeller Foundation on ‘Shared Value in Emerging Markets’ featuring moladi.

    2012 – Nominated by the Europe Business Assembly for the International Socrates Prize in economy and business category.

    2012 – Co-operative Finalist with Kingston University in the international Hult Global Case Challenge in association with the Clinton Global Initiative.

    2011 – moladi selected by the Smithsonian Institute to exhibit the technology in association with its Cooper Hewitt Museum at the UN Headquarters in New York.

    2010 – International Case Study on moladi conducted by the UNDP (United Nations Development Programme) on ‘Growing Inclusive Markets’.

    2010 – Hennie Botes, CEO of moladi, is awarded South Africa’s Science and Technologies best man by Men’s Health magazine.

    2009 – moladi named winner of the Affordable Housing Competition held by Data Bank in Accra, Ghana.

    2006 – Housing Innovation Award Winner of the ABSA Bank and NHBRC (National Home Builders Council) national competition in South Africa.

    2005 – Finalists in the TT100 (Top 100 Technology Awards), South Africa.

    1997 – Winner of the prestigious SABS (South African Bureau of Standards) Design for Development Award, South Africa.

    1991 – Winner of the International PRW Award for excellence – United Kingdom

     

    For more information visit www.moladi.co.za or www.moladi.com or www.moladi.net

     

  • How to get South Africa WORKING

    How to get South Africa WORKING

     A "TOOL" to get the unemployed working - Fight unemployment, hunger and crime through housing

    The backlog for Affordable Housing in South Africa are in the millions. The main culprit in increased cost and affordability is "skilled labour*. The lack of artisans in the construction trade continuously escalates due to the fact that there are no new "apprentices" enrolling. Bricklayers and plasterers are only two of the key artisans that effect the cost of building.

    moladi has embarked on developing technology primarily to reduce the dependence on skilled labour in order to reduce cost of construction, and also to increase production quality consistently eliminating costly rework.

    Although moladi formwork technology is primarily a manufacturer of a re-useable machine made patented formwork system that allows walls to be cast stronger faster for less, the principal focus is on the delivery of the “whole house”. A house consists of many components and the” assembly process” needs to be project managed in its entirety. That means windows, doors, roof, bath, toilet, paint, ceiling, glass, electrical hardware, etc. etc. needs to be planned ordered and supplied in order to avoid a “bottle neck” that would stop production creating “waste” resulting in an increase in cost. This in turn makes the product, the home, unaffordable to the majority of people.

    Through creative engineering and sophisticated manufacturing, moladi aims to advance living standards and spaces affordably. moladi is an advanced building technology that utilises an innovative re-usable plastic formwork system #plasticformwork to reduce the required skills to produce quality affordable homes and other structures that are socially acceptable by speeding up delivery and thus reducing cost. By emulating the methodology of the automotive assembly line, moladi implements the principles applied by Henry Ford; reducing cost by increasing production output by de-skilling the production operation, making homes affordable. #moladi

    Many people believe that if a house is produced, we have a customer. But, in Africa (and in the rest of the World) we need to create jobs for the customer in order for them to earn money, before they can actually buy the product. So, it is no use producing a house in a factory and trying to sell it to someone that doesn’t have an income or a job. Our focus and passion is to uplift the community by creating job opportunities producing homes" 

    Read more

    Reduce cost of Housing Construction 

    Insanity: Doing the same thing over and over agai expecting different results 

    Future of Construction - World Economic Forum

     

    moladi moulding mass housing

    "Produce moulds to produce components to produce formwork to produce houses to produce jobs to produce income to empower PEOPLE" - Hennie Botes

    Click on the link to view the interview conducted with Hennie Botes - Inventor and CEO of moladi - Link 

  • moladi classrooms for Gauteng Education Department

    moladi cast classrooms in record time

    moladi classrooms Gauteng strip

     

    Erect - Fill - Strip the next day. Two classroom with storage facilities (157 sqm). What a brilliant TEAM we have on site . All local labour that has never worked with moladi before . Our "teacher" taught them to produce this "superior" product in record time at a rate lower than conventional brick and mortar. The classroom project demonstration is key to the roll out in the education departments - Gauteng and all other provinces in South Africa - Thank you TEAM moladi !!!

    moladi classroom process

    #moladi #plasticformwork #classrooms #education #formwork

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